Newsletter – 2020-09-28

Newsletter editorial – 28-09-2020

After a good, albeit strange summer break, the Generation 2004 newsletter is back.

In this issue we will report on the reply we got on a note we sent to DG INGESTAD where we raised concerns over negative discrimination against Contract Agents and  ASTs who were not allowed to participate in the recently launched internal competitions. As it turns out… as usual… we were “wrong” and there is no such thing as discrimination in the Commission… On a loosely related topic, we have analysed the participation and inclusion, or lack thereof, of JRC AST colleagues into the AD certification exercise for ASTs. Yet again, absolutely no discrimination, which, in this instance, actually generates discrimination itself…

We also keep covering the CHAFEA debacle and the potential for the huge brain drain that may result from the undergoing relocation of the Executive Agency’s services to Brussels.

To end on a more positive note we will also cover the recent introduction of a national-insurance card for colleagues in the Netherlands and finally we cover the European Mobility week‘s most famous feature: its car-free Sunday, with an emphasis on how it happened in Brussels!

This is all for now and more will come soon, meanwhile, enjoy the reading!

Contract Agents’ and Assistants’ access to internal competitions: Reply by Director-General Ingestad

In early July, following the announcement of an internal Administrator (AD5) competition tailored only to temporary agents, Generation 2004 addressed a note on Contract Agents’ and Assistants’ access to internal competitions to the Director-General of DG HR, Gertrud Ingestad.

At the same time, we also launched a petition in support of contract agents. Continue reading Contract Agents’ and Assistants’ access to internal competitions: Reply by Director-General Ingestad

CHAFEA risking massive loss of expertise

So far, only one third of our remaining colleagues from the Consumers, Health, Agriculture and Food Executive Agency (Chafea) have declared their intention to move with their job to Brussels. This leaves two thirds to either change their mind or find an alternative and the clock is ticking (the 2-month deadline for staff to make a decision is fast approaching: accept the transfer or refuse?). Continue reading CHAFEA risking massive loss of expertise

Certification in the JRC – one size does not fit all

The numbers speak an unmistakable language.  The success rate of JRC ASTs in the certification procedure is considerably below that of ASTs from other DGs. While JRC’s ASTs accounted for approximately 9.5% of all ASTs in the Commission in 2019 [1], henceforth considered to be the benchmark, their share of certifications is much lower and persistently so (Figure 1): Except for a one-off-high in 2016 with a share of 7% (although still below 9.5%), the share of certifications in other years was much lower. Continue reading Certification in the JRC – one size does not fit all

A national-insurance card for colleagues in the Netherlands

If you work for the Commission in the Netherlands, you might have had some problems in the past with your health care, due to the lack of a health-insurance card. This results in additional costs for JSIS members, e.g. the “passantentarief” when you are not registered with a general practitioner (GP) and, since the JSIS does not issue a Dutch health-insurance card, you simply could not register with a practitioner.
In order to remedy this problem, the PMO has negotiated with a Dutch health insurer, CZ. The resulting agreement should guarantee a non-discriminatory treatment of JSIS beneficiaries under primary cover. Please note that the agreement does not apply to beneficiaries under top-up cover (they should already have a health-insurance card from their primary cover).

Update 05/10/2020: Following enquiries by colleagues, we have reached out to PMO to clarify who exactly is eligible for the CZ card at the moment. Right now, the CZ card is limited to active colleagues and pensioners who reside themselves in the Netherlands (and their family, if they reside in the Netherlands as well). Once the new system is running smoothly, PMO might consider extending the card to cases like staff members not residing in the Netherlands but whose children reside and study in the Netherlands. We will keep you informed.

Continue reading A national-insurance card for colleagues in the Netherlands